Home » Crazy Kids » The Heart and Sole of the Matter

The Heart and Sole of the Matter

I don’t understand how women can love shoe shopping. I personally despise it. I have never enjoyed looking for shoes for myself. This is due in part to the fact that I have large beastly feet that are impossible to fit with any relatively decent looking shoes. 

Tonight though, I thought it would be fine. We were, after all, shoe shopping for the kids and Rob. Not me, thank goodness. Of course, why all three kids and my husband felt the need to walk out of their shoes at the same time, I’ll probably never understand. Nonetheless, they needed shoes, so out we went in search of some.

I have a tendency to buy the cheapest shoes I can find. I figure the kids will wear them out in no time anyway, so I may as well spend as little as possible. Well, Nathan’s most recent pair lasted about three weeks before the toes started tearing apart. Seriously. Three weeks. We decided to try a new strategy.

The boys have each gone through four pairs of shoes since school started. Multiply that by about $10, and we have spent $80 on shoes. Now, if we were to spend a little more money on a good pair of shoes that would last a little bit longer, then we might end up saving money in the long run and the kids would go for more that a week or two without holes in their feet.

This is where tonight comes into play. The five of took over one sporting goods store for over an hour. The tricky part was finding shoes that weren’t too overly expensive (which most of them were) and also being able to agree on the same pair as the kids. Mom’s rule was that they had to be heavy-duty enough to play outside, run, ride bikes, hike and not crumble into dust. Dad’s rule was that we actually had to be able to pay for them. The kids’ rule was that they had to be super cool and fun. Much easier said than done, making all these rules work together.

Nathan wanted soccer cleats. When I refused, he decided on a pair of Woody and Buzz light up shoes that were about three sizes to small. No joke. William was set on a pair that were a size 5. No problem, except that they were a few sizes to big. Catheryn kept going back to the slippers that made animal noises when you walked. And Rob, well, he is just difficult when it comes to shoes. Please don’t get me started.

Three stores later, we somehow managed to agree on some heavy-duty Z-strap something-or-others for the boys. Catheryn got some multi-sport shoes with stretchy cords instead of ties. Bonus. Even Rob eventually found a pair of hiking boots that suited him. Me, well, I had a couple good hours to practice my breathing. Nice slow breaths. In and out, in and out.

Somehow we survived it. The kids all have solid new shoes and Rob has a great pair of boots that he is going to break in by walking to work tomorrow. I personally hope that we don’t have to do this again for a very long time. Or ever, that would be even better, though I don’t think I will be that lucky.

We are now broke. And I still hate shoe shopping. I guess some things never change…

4 thoughts on “The Heart and Sole of the Matter

  1. More expensive doesn’t always mean they are better either, though. I have a closet full of expensive shoes that hurt my feet because, I, too, have hard to fit feet. Some day I will find a pair that actually look good and feel good, but in the meantime…….

  2. I don’t have a “buy shoes” fetish. I did learn that to buy the right size for my feet. I had a “bunion” because of the tight shoes. I changed to a bigger size and it went away. Whew.

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